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Assistance for Public Agencies

Jean Sweeney Open Space Park and Cross Alameda Trail - ReScape/Bay-Friendly Rated in 2019

StopWaste helps public agencies in Alameda County enhance their communities with sustainable, climate-adaptive landscaping practices. We offer technical assistance for:

We also provide sustainable landscape presentations and trainings to city staff, elected officials, contractors and landscape architects. 

For information, contact Jennifer West.


Related Resources

  • The Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance is a statewide water conservation law for new and renovated landscapes that meet a certain size threshold.

    StopWaste has developed a WELO Tool Kit to help its member agencies implement the ordinance. The Tool Kit consists of model checklists, a water budget/water use calculator, and a permit counter brochure.

    Public agencies can use these materials as is or modify them to meet local requirements.

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  • Updated for 2019!

    This annual report recognizes—and quantifies—the commitment of StopWaste's member agencies to landscapes that provide multiple environmental and community benefits, including carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas reductions resulting from applying compost to the soil. 

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  • Healthy soils have come to the forefront in the last few years as a means to address climate mitigation and adaptation. This StopWaste report proposes nearly 50 measures addressing how soils, compost, and mulch can be incorporated into climate adaptation plans.

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  • Pleasanton Landscape Success Story cover image

    Learn how the City of Pleasanton used sheet mulch to convert a lawn along Main Street to a Bay-Friendly landscape that is saving as much as 384,000 gallons of water annually. Sheet mulching the lawn instead of excavating it kept 16.5 tons of turf out of the landfill. The new no-mow landscape looks great, costs less to maintain, and provides bird and pollinator habitat and other benefits.

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  • Read about the City of Alameda Housing Authority's renovation of the landscaping at Independence Plaza, a 186-unit affordable housing complex for seniors. Labor- and water-intensive turf and lagoons were replaced with a no-mow landscape featuring California native plants. The changes are saving 1.3 million gallons of water and reducing maintenance costs by $12,000 annually.

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  • The City of Hayward's Route 238 Capital Improvement Project is the biggest Bay-Friendly Rated Landscape to date. This project, which includes nearly seven acres of irrigated medians and other landscaping, was designed to save more than two million gallons of water annually. Download the two-page case study to learn more.

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  • Harbor Bay Success Story

    Learn how the Harbor Bay Median relandscaping project in Alameda used sheet mulch to replace 2.5 acres of conventional grass medians with a Bay-Friendly landscape that enhances the spectacular shoreline setting. Sheet mulching the median turf instead of excavating it kept 221 tons of turf out of the landfill.The new landscape has saved more than 9 million gallons of water in three years.

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Plant Debris Landfill Ban

Alameda County law prohibits disposal of plant debris in county landfills. Learn more.