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News & Announcements

  • food composting
    November 29, 2021

    Bay City News Service recently interviewed StopWaste's Jeff Becerra on the passage of the new Organics Reduction and Recycling Ordinance, which goes into effect Jan. 1, 2022, and aims to keep food and other compostable materials out of landfills to fight climate change. 

  • September 21, 2021

    The Alameda County Source Reduction and Recycling Board has a vacancy in the “Solid Waste Industry" category. The appointee must live in Alameda County. Term of the appointment is two years, and board members are eligible for re-appointment to one additional two-year term.

  • July 7, 2021

    The Alameda County Waste Management Authority selected current Deputy Executive Director Timothy Burroughs as the Agency’s incoming Executive Director, taking over leadership from Wendy Sommer, who, after 30 dedicated years of service at the Agency, will retire in July 2021.  

  • July 2, 2021

    EBMUD is doubling their lawn conversion rebates to $1.50 per sq ft! Replacing your lawn with water-wise plants will help your yard face a long-term drought.

  • Loved Twice sorting party
    June 22, 2021

    StopWaste has awarded a total of $580,985 in grant funding to 49 local nonprofit and for-profit organizations for projects focused on repair, reuse, food waste reduction, and food donation equipment.

  • Reusable takeout containers
    January 4, 2021

    The California Green Business Network recently recognized StopWaste’s environmental and sustainability practices with its Certified Green Innovator status, the nonprofit’s highest-ranking tier.

  • Business Efficiency Awards 2020
    December 15, 2020

    At a recognition event this week, StopWaste acknowledged the recipients of the 2019 StopWaste Business Efficiency Awards, given for outstanding achievements in waste reduction.

  • December 2, 2020

    We had a great time hosting our fall Healthy Soils Webina

  • October 14, 2020

    StopWaste works with urban farms and community gardens to fight climate change with carbon farming practices. Practices such as feeding the soil with compost and keeping unplanted areas covered help these communities grow healthy food and sequester carbon in the soil.

  • October 2, 2020

    Massive wildfires are part of the new norm in California and it's making gardeners concerned that smoke and ash are ruining their produce. Are the fruit and veggies that you worked so hard to grow still safe to eat?

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